Fun Friday – Rockets!

Fun Friday – Rockets!

 What is a rocket?

A rocket can describe any object that is propelled by fast moving liquid or gas! Most rockets have a nose or cone at the top, a body that houses the fuel and fins at the base. Rockets are usually powered by a chemical reaction (explosion) within the rocket itself. This chemical reaction requires both fuel and oxygen, both of which must be carried within the rocket. The fuel and oxygen are called the propellant. There are two types of propellant, liquid propellant and solid propellant. A solid propellant rocket is easier, simpler and cheaper to make.  However, these rockets are harder to guide and control as once the chemical reaction is started it is hard to stop. A liquid propellant rocket is more complex and expensive to make but the burning of the liquid fuel is allot easier to control.

A bit of history

The Chinese were the first to invent rockets when they started filling bamboo tubes with gunpowder and lighting them. Rocket science really began with an English man called Isaac Newton. He formulated three laws to explain the physics of motion. These laws explain how rockets work!

Newton‛s 3rd Law of Motion states that every action has an equal and opposite reaction!


To understand this law think of a balloon full of air. If the balloon is untied and the air suddenly let out, it will escape the balloon with such force that it will propel the balloon in the opposite direction. The force of the air leaving the balloon is called the thrust! The thrust that powers the launch of a rocket comes from the force of the gas (generated by the burning fuel) being ejected from the rear of the rocket!

The first liquid propellant rocket was launched in 1926 by an American called Robert Goddard.  He is considered the father of modern rocket

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#FunFriday – experiment with sound

This weeks #FunFriday experiment is a simple and easy way to teach children how sound moves in air.

What you will need:

  • An empty plastic bottle
  • Scissors
  • A piece of plastic (cut from a plastic bag or equivalent)
  • An elastic band or tape
  • Small candles
  • Matches

(Adult assistance required!)

Just follow the steps in the video… and the “big kids” among you might like the second

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Fun Friday – the coke and mentos experiment…with a bit of a twist!!

Fun Friday – the coke and mentos experiment…with a bit of a twist!!

It’s Friday so that can only mean one thing… another fun experiment to try, think you are going to like this one!

Nearly everyone seems to have heard of the classic “Coke & Mentos” experiment so we started with that… =&0=& A 2 Litre bottle of coke (Diet coke is best as it doesn’t leave a sticky mess) A packed of mentos mints Basically you want to place the bottle of coke on the ground and add as many mentos to it at once as possible and then stand way back!! =&1=&
  • Well you could pop one or two in quickly and it will work fairly well.
  • You could roll a piece of paper into a tube, sit it in the neck of the bottle and, gently pinch the base while you      fill it with mentos (up to ten is about right) and then let then all slip into the bottle when you release the pinch at the base!
  • There are devices specifically designed for delivering mentos into coke…. I bought this one from my local book  shop…
  • With this you insert the pin, load up with mentos, screw the devise onto the top of your bottle of coke and then pull the pin to release the mints into the coke.  There is even a little ring of plastic that drops down and covers the pin holes so all the coke goes upwards only.
  • You can make your own devise, like we did here (thanks Hubby)… does pretty much the same thing.
  • This is the one the I use for kids parties and events and it goes down a treat.  I don’t bother plugging the holes at the side so the coke fountains out the side as well as the top and it all adds to the effect!

=&2=&…

Fun, isn’t it, but I thought we could shake

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