The science of elasticity, energy and rubber

The science of elasticity, energy and rubber

Energy is a great subject in science. It covers so many things and I have many other aspects that I hope to share with you soon but one thing that explains energy so well is a simple rubber band; it can demonstrate elasticity, kinetic energy and potential

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In your Dreams – the science of why, how and when we dream

In your Dreams – the science of why, how and when we dream

Dreams, we all have them, some we remember, some we don’t! There are those who want to analyse every detail of their dreams, seeing them as portents to future events or windows into our souls. Some dismiss dreams as a nothing more than random

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Netflix Stream Team – a family pick of scifi, history and humour

Netflix Stream Team – a family pick of scifi, history and humour

So far this Irish Summer has been a bit of a washout. As I type, the wind is howling and the rain is sheeting down. We brave it when we can, and, when we can’t, we come up with indoor activities to amuse us. Sometimes

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Fun Friday – Rockets!

Fun Friday – Rockets!

 What is a rocket?

A rocket can describe any object that is propelled by fast moving liquid or gas! Most rockets have a nose or cone at the top, a body that houses the fuel and fins at the base. Rockets are usually powered by a chemical reaction (explosion) within the rocket itself. This chemical reaction requires both fuel and oxygen, both of which must be carried within the rocket. The fuel and oxygen are called the propellant. There are two types of propellant, liquid propellant and solid propellant. A solid propellant rocket is easier, simpler and cheaper to make.  However, these rockets are harder to guide and control as once the chemical reaction is started it is hard to stop. A liquid propellant rocket is more complex and expensive to make but the burning of the liquid fuel is allot easier to control.

A bit of history

The Chinese were the first to invent rockets when they started filling bamboo tubes with gunpowder and lighting them. Rocket science really began with an English man called Isaac Newton. He formulated three laws to explain the physics of motion. These laws explain how rockets work!

Newton‛s 3rd Law of Motion states that every action has an equal and opposite reaction!


To understand this law think of a balloon full of air. If the balloon is untied and the air suddenly let out, it will escape the balloon with such force that it will propel the balloon in the opposite direction. The force of the air leaving the balloon is called the thrust! The thrust that powers the launch of a rocket comes from the force of the gas (generated by the burning fuel) being ejected from the rear of the rocket!

The first liquid propellant rocket was launched in 1926 by an American called Robert Goddard.  He is considered the father of modern rocket

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Pancakes- everything you didn’t realise you needed to know

Pancakes- everything you didn’t realise you needed to know

Ok, this week’s blog inspiration is slightly different to the norm.  Usually the idea comes from a question that a child has posed – this time there is a slight deviation, but only slight…. this weeks question came from an

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